Newfoundland and Labrador Historic Sites

Cape Spear Lighthouse National Historic Site
Stark white Cape Spear Lighthouse pierces a sky swirling with seabirds atop a craggy headland. It overlooks a vast expanse of indigo ocean where glittering processions of icebergs glide by, Humpback whales breach and pods of porpoises send misty spouts into the Atlantic air. On North America’s easternmost point of land, historic Cape Spear Lighthouse, the oldest surviving lighthouse in Newfoundland and Labrador, offers a glimpse into the lives of 19th century lighthouse keepers and their families.

Castle Hill National Historic Site

Step back to a time when the fate of North America hung in the balance. Imagine cannons and muskets blazing as British and French forces battled on the shores of Newfoundland, vying for control of the lucrative fishery. Enter Castle Hill National Historic Site, a stone fort standing sentinel over a picturesque seaside town, and explore a chapter of history that determined the fate of a continent.

Hawthorne Cottage National Historic Site

In a fishing community on the rocky Newfoundland coast is a window to Canada’s maritime past and the life of one of the country’s greatest Arctic explorers. Retrace the daring exploits of Captain Bob Bartlett, commander of more than 20 Arctic voyages in the early and mid 20th century, inside Hawthorne Cottage, his family’s beloved homestead. See rare artefacts from his expeditions and period furnishings as you tour the cottage and explore its heritage gardens.

Hopedale Mission National Historic Site
Hopedale Mission National Historic Site Canada is a complex of large, wooden buildings constructed by the Moravian Church at Hopedale, Labrador. These large, wooden structures stand starkly silhouetted against the rocky shoreline of the vast, barren landscape. Official recognition refers to the cultural landscape comprised of the mission buildings on their shoreline site.

L’Anse aux Meadows National Historic Site
At the tip of Newfoundland’s Great Northern Peninsula lies the first known evidence of European presence in the Americas. Here Norse expeditions sailed from Greenland, building a small encampment of timber-and-sod buildings over 1000 years ago Against a stunning backdrop of rugged cliffs, bog, and coastline, discover the fascinating archaeological remains of the Viking encampment, declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1978. You’ll meet costumed Viking interpreters as you tour the recreated base camp and discover original artifacts from this internationally renowned archaeological find.

Port au Choix National Historic Site
On the west side of Newfoundland’s Great Northern Peninsula, you’ll find the crossroads of 6000 years of human history. The sea’s bounty drew Maritime Archaic Indian, Dorset and Groswater Paleoeskimo, and “Recent Indian”s here long before Europeans arrived. Seals on passing iceflows were hunted by the Dorset and used for food, shelter and clothing.

Discover one of North America’s most fascinating archaeological finds amid a rugged coastline of unique limestone barrens, forests and bays. Visit ancient burial sites, settlements and view original artifacts, from slate spears to harpoons.

Red Bay National Historic Site
During the mid-16th century, large numbers of right and bowhead whales drew whalers from the Basque region of Spain and France to the Strait of Belle Isle, where they established a major whaling port at Red Bay. For some 70 years, Basque whalers made the dangerous, month-long journey across the Atlantic to hunt whales and produce the oil that lit the lamps of Europe.

See original Basque artifacts, remains, and restored chalupa at this national historic site and World Heritage Site.

Ryan Premises National Historic Site
A salty scent lingers within the cluster of white, 19th century clapboard buildings of the Ryan Premises, perched on the shore of Bonavista’s historic and picturesque harbour. Hear the reminiscences of the site’s interpreters, most of whom have a personal connection to the fishing industry; marvel at the variety of artifacts in the on-site Bonavista Museum; and explore the internationally-recognized “Cod, Seals and Survivors” exhibition that tells the 500-year story of Canada’s east coast fishery.

Signal Hill National Historic Site
As St. John’s most popular landmark, Signal Hill recalls the town’s historic past and communications triumph, as well as offering coastal hikes and colourful performances against sweeping views overlooking the Atlantic. Signal Hill was the site of St. John’s harbour defences from the 17th century to the Second World War and where Guglielmo Marconi received the world’s first transatlantic wireless signal in 1901.

kitjigattalik – Ramah Chert Quarries National Historic Site
Site actively quarried from 5,000 to 600 years ago for Ramah chert, a visually distinctive and important stone type used by several ancient cultures of the northeast in the manufacture of tools and other objects.
Torngat Mountain National Park, Newfoundland and Labrador

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